Goulart 2010 “The Marshall” Malbec

 

Goulart "The Marshall" Malbec 2010

Goulart “The Marshall” Malbec 2010

     The 2010 vintage of Goulart’s “The Marshall” Malbec keeps this winery’s tradition of giving us a good Argentine Malbec at an exceptional price alive and well.  This vintage will not disappoint the followers of “The Marshall” because it checks all the boxes that has made this wine a perennial favorite.  If you are looking for a fruit forward wine with cherry and berry flavors this is not the wine for you.  “The Marshall” has fruit but it is dark fruit that is integrated into the body of the wine.  This classic Malbec has mid-range tannins contained in a firm structure that is carried from start to finish.  The aroma is one of spice and there is oak to spare for those who prefer an exotic oak component in their Malbec.  Malbec is a perfect pairing for grilled meat, especially beef, so if you are planning a cook out be sure to grab a couple of bottles of Goulart 2010 “The Marshall” Malbec to enjoy with your meal.  This wine has been rated 88 points by Wine Spectator and 87 points by International Wine Cellar. P.L.C.B. stores  are currently offering this wine as a “Chairman’s Selection” for $13.99 Product code 33356. 

Vina Equia Rioja 2008

Vina Equia Rioja 2008

Vina Equia Rioja 2008

     The beat goes on from Bodegas Equía, in the village of Elcigo in the heart of Rioja Alavesa.  Their Viña Equía Rioja 2008 is a good example of a well made Tempranillo at great sale price of $8.99 at P.L.C.B. stores.  This Rioja has flavors of lush ripe red fruit and lightly toasted oak all contained in a rich medium-bodied wine that displays its’ silky tannins throughout the finish.  Bodegas Equía produces this ruby-red colored Rioja by fermenting the Tempranillo grapes for 15 days in stainless steel vats while doing daily pumpovers to extract the greatest amount of color and  flavor from the grapes.  The wine then goes into stainless steel tanks for malolactic fermentation and then is  racked twice before being aged 12 months in American oak.  Wine Advocate rated this vintage at 91 points and Wine Spectator gave it an 87 rating, while not as highly rated as the 2007 vintage that I reviewed last April, this is an exceptional wine at a bargain price.

Bidding is Now Open!

All Materials Courtesy of Morrell & Company Fine Wine Auction

All Materials Courtesy of Morrell & Company Fine Wine Auction

    Have you ever wanted to bid on a great bottle of wine offered at a wine auction but could not stand the thought of sitting in a room filled with wine snobs while holding a little paddle with a number on it.  If your answer is yes then you are in luck because Morrell & Company Fine Wine Auction is conducting an internet only auction on Wednesday February 27th at 10:30 a.m.(EST) on their website www.morrellwineauctions.com.   Bids may only be placed by absentee bid and live bid.  Absentee bids may be placed now and the live bidding will be available online at the commencement of the auction.  To participate go to the website and register, peruse the catalog of offerings then place a bid if you find something you like.  If you intend to bid live, Morrell recommends using their Live Bidding Simulator to check your computers compatibility to prevent any issues when live bidding starts.  Need more information? Call 212-307-4200 

Free Wine Vintage App

English: Wine grapes. Español: Uvas de vino ro...

     If you have ever been in a store or restaurant  and were unsure of which wine to purchase this app can help.  M. Shanken Communications, Inc. has released  Vintage Chart+ By Wine Spectator so you can carry one of Wine Spectator’s most popular features around in your smart phone.  This new version can be very helpful in choosing the right wines from the most popular wine regions of the world.  This app has lots of useful information so when you add in the fact that it is free it immediately becomes a must have application.  To get it go to the itunes store and search the free apps.

To Age or Not to Age

     When I was growing up I can remember old Hollywood movies of  G.I’s in WWII finding wine cellars in french chateaus that were filled with cobwebs and dusty old wine bottles. It was from those images that most of us got the idea that any wine just got better with age. That idea just isn’t true. The truth is that wines are like people, they come into the world young and underdeveloped. The next phase is the prime years, that is when they have achieved the most character and depth of flavor. Finally they reach a stage that is past their prime and go down hill from there. Most wines are made to be consumed within 2 to 3 years from their production. The time frame from harvest to your glass has so many variables that it is mind-boggling. Every wine maker has a vision for each wine that they will make and this plan is fluid so that adjustments can be made as needed. I would say that any wine you buy today is ready to drink and enjoy because it wouldn’t have been released if it wasn’t. You can find vintage charts online that will tell you if a wine is ready to drink and the time horizon for its prime years. Now take that bottle  your Great Uncle Joe brought back from the war and clean it up and use it as a decoration.